Colosseum Tour

Colosseum Tour

The Colosseum tour starts off from Piazza Venezia, we can climb the steps that lead us to the top of Capitol Hill, one of the famous seven hills. It was the political and religious center of ancient Rome. It’s today the seat of the City Hall. The square was laid out by Michelangelo in 16th century and decorated with testate of the emperor Marcus Aurelius (the same emperor that in the movie Gladiator with Russel Crowe was killed by his son Commodus)

A walk down the hill takes us to the Forum. It was the most important square of Ancient Rome used as daily market place and meeting-point. Around this square, the Romans constructed the most important buildings, temples and palaces as the Roman Senate where the senators met and decided the destiny of the known world and Titus Arch built to celebrate the Roman Empire victory over the Jews.

We can walk along the Victory’s road in the Forum, leading us to the Colosseum, the ancient world’s largest amphitheater. Even though centuries have gone by, you are no doubt familiar with the sights and sounds of the Colosseum. Gladiators, animals and spectacles entertained the thousands of Romans who gathered, free of charge.

Tour length: 2/3 hours

 

Sistine Chapel Tour

Sistine Chapel Tour

Sistine Chapel Tour

Our  Sistine chapel tour will focus on the most famous and grandiose religious monument hidden in the heart of the Vatican museums, the Sistine Chapel by Michelangelo.

The Sistine Chapel is located inside the Vatican museums that are among the most visited museums in the world.

Over 7 millions tourists flock to discover the splendor of these 12 museums annually. The museums are compromised of no less than five galleries and 1.400 rooms, inaugurated in 1771. They consist  of an extraordinary collection of works of art, mainly paintings and sculptures, collected over the centuries by the popes.

After visiting the Sistine Chapel , we will pass through a door (for tour guides only) that will get us directly to St. Peter's Basilica. The tickets, purchased for this tour,  will allow us to skip the lines. This will give us more time to enjoying exploring this memorable sight together.

Saint Peter is the largest basilica in the world. Construction began in 1506, but was not completed  until 1626. It contains wonderful masterpieces like the Pietà by Michelangelo or the canopy over the main altar by Gian Lorenzo Bernini. Upon entering the church, you will overwhelmed by the beauty of its hundreds of giant mosaics and the atmosphere that reigns in this amazing house of worship.

Tour length: 2/3 hours.

 


Suggestions: Vatican dress code – no bare shoulders, skirts and shorts under the knees, no weapons ad no big bags or backpacks.

Baths of Diocletian Tour

Baths of Diocletian Tour

Bathing played a major part in ancient Roman culture and society. Bathing was one of the most common daily activities in Roman culture, and was practiced across a wide variety of social classes. Though many contemporary cultures see bathing as a very private activity conducted in the home, bathing in Rome was a communal activity.

Once the largest ancient baths complex in the world, the Baths of Diocletian – or Terme di Diocleziano – were built between 298AD and 306AD in honour of the Roman Emperor Diocletian.

Set out along the traditional model of a Roman baths complex, the Baths of Diocletian contained a frigidarium (cold room), tepidarium (warm room) and caldarium (hot room or steam room) as well as additional large bathing chambers, gymnasiums and even a library. The baths themselves were a hugely impressive building project, particularly given how swiftly they were constructed. The majority of the water for the baths was supplied by the Acqua Marcia.

The key difference with other contemporary baths was simply a question of scale – it is believed that at their height the Baths of Diocletian could hold up to 3,000 people at a time.

After 30 years of restoration the Baths opened to the public in 2008 and became part of the National Museum of Rome. At present we will be able to visit some remaining parts of the remarkable structure. It will be  even possible to walk through a cloister garden projected by Michelangelo where nearly 400 works of art, including statues, sarcophagi and reliefs, are on display.

Look at this video with a gorgeous rendering about the old Bath:

Terme di Diocleziano | Ricostruzione Virtuale CAPWARE from Capware on Vimeo


Photo reference: Folegandros, Stilko, Antmoose / Anthony M, G.dallorto et al., Wikimedia Commons

Florence Day Trip

Florence Day Trip

One day in Florence? Mission possible!

One should always try to dedicate more than one day to any of the world’s great cities, Florence included. With this premise, if you’ve got to do it, I will help you choose what to see so that you make the most out of your limited time.

We can catch the train in Rome and in 1h20 we will be there!

Starting from St. Maria Novella station we will walk up to the famous Duomo with Brunelleschi’s cupola, Giotto’s Bell Tower and the Baptistery. Nearby we will visit the Accademia with Michelangelo’s David (reservation in advance).

Strolling down via Roma we will find ourselves in Piazza della Signoria in front of Palazzo Vecchio, the city’s seat of government with an incredible outdoors statues setting. The David out there is a cop.

We will walk then to the end of the Uffizi buildings (no time to visit them) to the Arno and catch a view of the river and the Ponte Vecchio.

On the way back to the station, we will go to via Tornabuoni – the luxury shopping street – and hop into the church of Santa Trinita where you’ll be rewarded by a beautiful fresco by Ghirlandaio. Look carefully at the backgrounds of each scene as you should recognize some of these locations – we’ve seen them together!

It is possible to go to Florence from Rome by train (1hour 20 minutes) in order to spend a day there and come back in the late afternoon.